Friday, 30 September 2016 16:30

How Reducing Social Isolation Protects Health In Older Adults

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"By one means or another we need to get more established individuals back near developing kids on the off chance that we are to reestablish a feeling of group, a learning of the past, and a feeling without bounds."

- Margaret Mead

Activities between the eras are not just an extraordinary approach to help obtain information and insight – they’re likewise fun.

Individuals of every age can take in a great deal from each other if everyone keeps a receptive outlook and values the extraordinary difficulties that go along with the task. This may appear as grandchildren showing an older generation how to utilize innovation and new technology or sharing contemporary choices in media. Similarly, youthful ones can find age-old tunes or classic motion pictures that are generally as meaningful today as they were decades prior.

The immense difficulty we face is building up the basic knowledge of others, which may include a conflict of qualities when individuals from various age groups work and learn together.

Does the WWII vet who hasn't addressed the effects of war have anything at all in common with a youngster inclined to over sharing details about her day on Twitter? Will a senior, whose state of mind about race and gender roles were shaped amid more difficult times, talk eagerly with the student who grew up finding out about the Civil Rights Era from history books?

At the point when individuals coincide, it begins to dissipate negative and harsh generalizations we too often make of others.  charlotte youth and senior

Researcher Dr. Morris Massey said, “We don’t have to agree with the values of different generations, but we can strive to understand the mind-sets of different generations and how each group sees the world based on their experiences.”

Though a senior may only interact in person or by means of telephone, a younger generation may only connect through advanced technological means such as email or instant message. Spanning such differences requires adaptability in your reasoning and thinking.

We are molded by the occasions of our lives, and history occurs in repeated cycles. People born after WW2, for instance, most likely had their virtues affected by parents who grew up amid the economic downturn of the Great Depression. They may discover a shared view with Generation X-ers who recall the economic crisis of 2008, or new school graduates who have attempted to discover steady employment ever since.

The advantage of intergenerational association for seniors is lessening disengagement and destitution among our elderly community, who in turn enhance the lives of children, young adults, and seniors by sharing their understanding on the world as leaders, examples, or teachers. Through regular communication, they can become supporters for each other and solve problems relating to lack of education, ecological and health issues, crime avoidance, and a so many more.

As indicated by Generations United, such intergenerational exercises permit seniors to stay dynamic and connected to their community, which adds to living longer with better physical and emotional health. Overall, they tend to appreciate a higher personal satisfaction from having meaningful relationships in young adults and children.

“Older adults who regularly volunteer with children burn 20% more calories per week, experience fewer falls, are less reliant on canes, and perform better on a memory test than their peers,” the organization states. “Older adults with dementia experience more positive effect during interactions with children.”

What’s the advantage for our younger generations? Creating abilities and valuable life skills, values, and a feeling of citizenship. By imparting a culture, historical and cultural customs are well preserved.

"Together we are stronger," states Generations United.

At Regency at Pineville, everyday life is an intergenerational movement as our youthful staff and volunteers look after seniors and those requiring additional help with daily tasks. We welcome that our senior community offers a breadth of intelligence and advice to us and are a quality to society by their endeavors to contribute to their Regency community in every effort possible.

For more information on communication with intergenerational groups, the Charmm'd Foundation offers a list that can be seen at: http://www.charmmdfoundation.org/resource-library/effective-communication/checklist-communicating-different-generations

Call today and talk with our Activities Director to learn of satisfying ways you can start working with seniors.

To discover more about Regency Senior Living Charlotte, call (704) 542-9449. 

Written by: Katie Hanley

Read 351 times Last modified on Monday, 25 September 2017 13:03

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