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Charlotte Retirement Living (33)

Wednesday, 31 January 2018 22:48

Retirement Living: Legal and Financial Terms to Know

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wills and power of attorneyWith advancing age comes the need to communicate our wishes if we should become incapacitated by age or injury.

Certified Estate Planning Specialist Martin L. Pierce, an attorney with the Pierce Law Firm in Chattanooga, Tenn., explained some of the legal documents that families may encounter as they prepare to set up legal arrangements to care for a family patriarch or matriarch. 

"There are definitely big differences between Power of Attorney, Conservatorship, Irrevocable Trust, etc.," Pierce said. "There are slight differences, particularly in terminology, in different states or localities. 'Conservatorship' and 'guardianship' are basically interchangeable, for example."

Some of the terms that might be mentioned:

Probate: Defined as the process of proving a will is valid and thereafter administering the estate of a dead person according to the terms of the will.

Estate: Financial affairs.

Power of Attorney: A written document signed by a person giving another person the power to act in conducting the signer's business, including signing papers, checks, title documents, contracts, handling bank accounts and other activities in the name of the person granting the power.

Legal Conservatorship or Guardianship: A guardian and protector appointed by a judge to protect and manage the financial affairs and/or the person's daily life due to physical or mental limitations or old age. The conservator may also take charge of overseeing the daily activities, such as health care or living arrangements of the conservatee. A court-appointed investigator determines need, desire and understanding of the potential conservatee as well as the suitability of the proposed conservator. The conservator is required to make regular accountings which must be approved by the court. The conservator may be removed by order of the court if no longer needed, upon the petition of the conservatee or relatives, or for failure to perform his/her duties. Pierce said this is an expensive and time-consuming process, effective immediately or upon proof of incapacity.

Durable Financial Power of Attorney: The durable part prevents the financial document from automatically ending, in most states, if a person becomes incapacitated. A designated agent is named to act in one's best interest, maintain accurate records, keep property separate, and avoid conflicts of interest. Durable power of attorney automatically ends at one's death, which is why a will is also advised to name that person as executor of an estate.

Revocable Trust, aka Living Trust: A document that contains instructions on the management of property during the lifetime of a person. Pierce said this kind of document is important because "you can make any changes when you like to the trust -- or do away with the trust -- as long as you are alive and competent," Pierce said. "This comes in handy if you were to change spouses or decide you want to disinherit your children and leave your estate to a charity… you (can also) retain the power to completely revoke or change the trust, (so that) Uncle Sam ignores it for income and gift tax purposes. In other words, you file an income tax return (Form 1040) as if the trust did not exist and you do not have to report the transfer of any property to the trust on a gift tax return… The funding of a Revocable Trust is, in effect, simply a retitling of your assets without giving up any control over them, (thus) such assets are includable in your estate for estate and inheritance tax purposes. This does not mean that you will necessarily have to pay these taxes, it simply means that the assets in a Revocable Trust must be reported."

Irrevocable Insurance Trust: An arrangement "designed to avoid these taxes."

Pourover Will: A Will which says, in effect, that "any property which you may own at the time of your death which is subject to probate (that is, not titled in the Trust) should be distributed to the Trustee of your Revocable Trust and added to it so that the Trustee can distribute it as you have directed in the trust… it pours any unanticipated assets in your name alone at the time of your death over to your trust." What type of arrangement is best? Pierce said tax implications and how much power given to handle finances are key to answering that question.

To create legally valid arrangements, one must properly complete and sign forms. Pierce suggests discussing the consequences of any distributions with him or an accountant before distributions are made. An AV Preeminent rated lawyer with Martindale-Hubbell, Pierce is also a Mid-South Super Lawyer® in the areas of Estate Planning and Elder Law, was selected to Best Lawyers in America for Trusts and Estates, and is an AVVO Top-Rated Lawyer. He is also a member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, and he is an Accredited Attorney with the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is an Accredited Estate Planner® by the National Association of Estate Planners & Councils. These credentials make him an authority on estate planning and elder law.

To learn more about elder law, call Martin Pierce at (423) 648-4303. To learn more about Regency Senior Living, call (844) 425-4254.

Written by Steven Stiefel

assisted living charlotteForgetfulness happens. Maybe once or twice, no biggie. However, if you notice that you or loved ones are forgetting important things on a regular basis, do not dismiss it. While age does attribute to memory loss, it could also be an indicator of a neurological condition that affects memory.

For example, if constant confusion and cloudiness prevent you or a loved one from knowing what day of the week it is, that is cause for concern, as it could result in missed medications or an overdose. Forgetting a daily vitamin is not an issue, but not maintaining prescribed doses for health conditions such as CAD (coronary artery disease) as directed can be downright dangerous.

Seniors who self-administer may also be at risk from drug interactions, as the consumption of multiple medications can cause adverse effects. An example might include avoiding migraine or severe headache medication if you have high blood pressure or any other type of cardiovascular disease.

Because medications are vital to treating conditions like heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke and lower respiratory diseases, consider assisted living to provide the quality care needed to keep you or your loved ones healthy and safe.

Is it time to consider assisted living in Charlotte, NC?

With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to self-medicate without the assistance of a caretaker administering regularly and as directed. In many cases, a medication scare is the reason for transitioning into an assisted living community.

At Regency, our nurses assess all medications and medical history to make proper recommendations to physicians. For residents visiting a new doctor, we have a full list of medications and history that we can send for patient records.

We can also provide transportation to the doctor’s office to get the senior treated without a family member having to take time off work to serve this need.

At our assisted living community, each resident receives personalized care to meet their healthcare needs.

The great thing about our assisted living community is that it provides continuous healthcare services that are a more affordable alternative to nursing home care, which can be costly, as it is 24/7 medical treatment.

At our assisted living community, each resident receives personalized care in a home-like setting which offers freedom while also keeping residents safe and secure.

Regency care providers work to make sure residents are given their medications at the right times and at the correct dosages.

Assisted Living communities like Regency of Pineville offers scheduled activities and medication management to keep residents moving, as this encourages longevity, health and lifelong happiness.

For more information about our senior care services including medication management, call (704) 542-9449 today!

Monday, 25 September 2017 06:00

Health Tips for Seniors

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health tips for seniors CharlotteThere are plenty of great reasons to make sure you are getting adequate nutrition as you age. Even as your appetite and daily recommended calories decrease, your need for crucial vitamins and minerals that can contribute to better eyesight, bone density, and cognitive function can increase. To increase your quality of life and help stave off certain health conditions, follow these health tips for seniors.

One common dietary pitfall for seniors is getting enough protein and fiber. Protein is important for maintaining muscle strength and healthy organs. Fiber helps avoid constipation, and can also improve blood sugar levels and help you absorb micronutrients.

Legumes like black beans, pinto beans, kidney beans, and black-eyed peas are all great ways to get a healthy serving of both. You can also enjoy whole-grains and whole wheat rather than white flour or empty starches. Rye grain, oatmeal, grits, and brown rice are also higher in protein and fiber than white or refined flours.

Some seniors might have experienced a decline in physical activity, or could be spending less time outdoors. That could contribute to a Vitamin D deficiency that makes it hard to absorb calcium, in turn affecting bone strength. But by eating dairy products like milk and yogurt fortified with Vitamin D, you can help your body get what it needs. Tuna, salmon, sardines, fortified orange juice, and some fortified cereals can also give you a dose of Vitamin D.

Seniors should also focus on staying hydrated. Our bodies retain less moisture as we mature, which can not only lead to dry skin or dry mouth, but also proper kidney and colon function. Making sure you get plenty of water is crucial. Milk or herbal tea are great options. Be certain you don’t consume too much juice or soda, however, as too much sugar can affect health conditions like diabetes.

Coffee and black tea can be diuretics, which help dehydrate you further. Too much salt can likewise dry you out, and lead to conditions like high blood pressure. So keep an eye on how much sodium you are consuming, and opt for snacks like unsalted nuts, pretzels, rice cakes, and popcorn.

Our Regency at Pineville family knows first hand what a big impact a senior living community can have on seniors’ nutritional needs. We take the effort and guesswork out of eating right by providing 3 healthy meals a day, plus fun events like Movie and Snack nights, Coffee and Conversation mornings, and holiday parties.

After all, good nutrition is important, but so is savoring your favorite foods during your golden years. The trick is finding balance, and taking the effort out of things like cooking and cleaning in favor of spending more time enjoying eating, conversing, and living life.

Written by: Meghan O'Dea

If you’ve spent time with someone suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia, you know from experience that communication can be a challenge. Long term memories go hazy, words aren’t always on the tip of the tongue, and you might be getting used to a shift in roles, such as child to caretaker. But with creative expression, you can ease some of the communication frustrations that come with the types of dementia. Creative expression is as simple as drawing images while listening to music, storytelling, dancing, and many more!  Artistic expressions can have a major impact, not only on quality time spent with loved ones, but on their overall mood and communication skills.

Charlotte dementia care activities

Studies have shown that giving seniors the opportunity to express themselves in this way can have a major benefit for their cognitive function, mental health, and quality of life. After all, just because they don’t discuss the same subjects and memories they used to doesn’t mean they don’t have something to say. Creative expression is a great opportunity to tap into feelings, observations, humor, and knowledge. The healing powers of art and other forms of creative expression, can likewise enhance memory and the ability to reminisce.

Those who have facilitated storytelling workshops and other narrative activities for seniors have noted that even those who are usually quiet and reluctant to speak become more engaged after participating in creative projects. In groups, memory care patients find new ways to relate and relay information. All that matters is that the seniors are invited to share in a positive environment. These exercises have been clinically shown to not only benefits patients, but caregivers, too. By focusing on what empowers and delights seniors, in return friends, family, and professionals have a more rounded view of those with dementia and Alzheimer’s and their capabilities.

One 2009 study revealed that the creative storytelling method can foster meaningful engagement between patients with dementia and their caregivers by encouraging seniors to rediscover their imaginations. In other words, by focusing on what memory care residents are good at and what they enjoy, the focus is put on the individual, rather than their condition.

The activity itself is pretty simple. Take photos of humans, animals, or even illustrations and ask residents what they think. Show another image, and ask how that impacts the narrative. For example, you could show a man on a plane, followed by an image of the same man on the beach. What do participants think he is doing? Is he on vacation? A scientist? A father in search of his long lost children? The possibilities are endless, as is the fun you might have when discussing them with the assisted living resident in your life.

Written by: Meghan O’Dea

Charlotte Senior Couple SmilingRetirement is a shining goal for many; its a reminder of all you’ve accomplished and earned during your years of working, raising children, and chasing the American dream. However, retirement planning can also be intimidating to take the step into this new phase of life, as it is a major transition from life we’ve known before. There’s so much precedent to help us understand the career and childrearing years, and not so much to tell us what finish line of retirement might look like. It’s ok if you feel adrift, but also know that it’s entirely possible to renew your sense of purpose and redefine what you want your new season of life to look like.

There are a number of ways to make this one of the most joyful periods of your life. No longer encumbered by the hectic schedule of career building and raising babies, you now have a unique opportunity to decide how you want to fill your spare time. The wonderful thing about your golden years is you get to decide what defines you beyond outside markers of success. Think about what you want to be known for? What makes you happy? And what motivated you in the past? These are great guides for what will give you a more joyful today and tomorrow.

One key place to begin is by being active. Studies show that increased physical activity can help seniors not only combat chronic medical conditions and stave off new ones, but it also increases mental wellbeing. Exercise increases endorphins which give you a sense of accomplishment and a time to contemplate life to exist fully in the present. Mindfulness, or the act of being consciously aware of yourself and surroundings in the moment, can be a huge part of activity. Taking a walk, for example, can give you an opportunity to be fully aware of the sights and sounds around you, as well as the feeling of walking and the ways your body feels as you are moving. This kind of meditation can lead to greater self-awareness, and a fuller sense of yourself, as a unique person.

Another is to actively engage with your past. As beneficial as it can be to throw yourself into the present moment, it can be equally fulfilling to throw yourself into nostalgia. The act of remembrance can help many seniors to have a stronger sense of self, reduce stress, and lower incidents of anxiety and depression. By revisiting your happiest and strongest memories, you can have a better sense of what makes you happiest and to what events you have the strongest connection.

Those memories can be guideposts for what you do next— you can seek out new connections and opportunities that bring out the same feelings. If you loved raising your children, perhaps you can work with an organization that provides extracurricular activities and supports a passion for youth. If you had a hobby that you had to put aside for a career, you could return to your interest in astronomy, literature, languages, or the arts.

No matter what you interests were in the past, there are also opportunities to cultivate new ones. One of the wonderful things about a big metropolitan area like Charlotte is the opportunity to find all sorts of new things to do, from gallery openings to concerts to new food flavors. You can check out the Levine Museum of the New South, Bechtler Museum of Modern Art, or the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center for cultural events that might be outside your usual beat. Or try gourmet twists on classic dishes like donuts at Joe's Doughs, burgers at Moo & Brew, classic arcade games at 8.2.0.

Whatever you choose to do, it helps to have a good community to do it with. Studies show that socially connected seniors suffer less stress and fewer mood disorders than those who are more isolated. The same is true of socially connected seniors who are more likely to seek medical care for routine tests and ailments. Connecting with a community helps to give you a context, a place in the world, a sense of self-definition. When it comes to celebrating your unique self, wouldn’t you rather do that with others on the same journey? If you want to learn more about how a retirement community like Regency Retirement Village of Charlotte can help enhance your golden years and help you find your sense of purpose, call (844) 425-4254.

Written by: Meghan O'Dea

Friday, 31 March 2017 16:40

The Importance of Spirituality in Seniors

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Charlotte senior group singingThe importance of religion and spiritual health in one's life commonly increases with age. It is especially high in seniors. Inside our Regency community, religion has emphatically influenced our residents to live a fulfilling and flourishing life. Whether this takes place in fun-filled group activities, congregational services, singing hymns together, scripture study, or just prayer in one’s own apartment, expressions of faith are vital to the lives of most Regency residents and seniors in general.

But did you know that participating in such spiritual activity offers higher physical and mental wellbeing, and also broadens life expectancy? Health benefits have been known to include offsetting the ill effects of depression, anxiety, and illness amid difficult life circumstances.

Here's the breakdown of studies:

  • In contrast to the Millennial generation, seniors are more likely to regularly participate in religious activities, as they were raised in a time when church involvement was an integral to American life. Forty-eight percent of seniors go to religious services all the time.
  • The majority of seniors studied reported that using religion to overcome life difficulties, such as an illness or the loss of a life partner. It additionally revealed that 71 percent of Southerners described themselves as "true believers" that God exists.

  • Religious gatherings are significant to the lives of our senior residents. Sixty-five percent of senior participants say that religion is exceptionally pertinent to them, their daily life, and family.

  • Religion offers a great sense of self-awareness, as well as social awareness. Sixty-seven percent of seniors said that having religious beliefs in their lives offers greater satisfaction.

The takeaway from these insights? Religious practices increase happiness, which, in turn, increases health and prosperity in seniors and the community.

At Regency, it could be said that spirituality is the cornerstone of our organization. Being a Christian institution, we value the dedication and sacrament of all religious practices, regardless of culture or belief.

In effort to empower our community and boost health and wellness, we encourage everyone to join us for motivational social events, fun, educational outings, and daily spiritual activities. Come visit us today and see what life at Regency of Charlotte has to offer! 

Written by: Katie Hanley

Tuesday, 28 February 2017 22:40

Your Guide to Senior Care Services

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Regency at Pineville offers full continuum care, along with numerous services and amenities for community residents. If you are considering senior care but don’t know which care option is the best fit, here are the various senior care options available to you. Charlotte Senior Care Guide

Independent living: this retirement lifestyle is ideal for those who are still active and independent, but prefer to have someone cook and clean for them.

Independent living may be for you if:

  • You are capable of living autonomously
  • You are not in need of medical care

In-home caregiving: this senior care lifestyle is contingent upon the condition of the senior, which involves routine checkups to guarantee the wellbeing and personal satisfaction of the senior.

In-Home Care may be for you if:

  • You need assistance with routine household care and daily tasks
  • You are worried about the higher costs of assisted living

Assisted Living: this senior care lifestyle is ideal for mature seniors who find that they require help from others to get around or fulfill daily tasks, not including intensive medical care treatments.

Assisted Living may be for you if:

  • You need help with day to day tasks, e.g. showering, dressing, and pharmaceuticals
  • You are required to have 24-hour monitoring and an emergency response system

Memory Care: this specialized senior care offers a vibrant quality of life to residents in need of personalized care considerations and exercises.

Memory Care may be for you if:

  • You are encountering the onset of dementia or Alzheimer's
  • You are in need of a full continuum care community

As with any medical decision, consult with a doctor or healthcare specialist for their professional recommendation of which senior care level is right for you. Additionally, for questions or concerns regarding senior care placement, contact us today for your no commitment consultation! Our community consultant specialists are available to assess resident needs, answer senior living inquiries, and happily welcome you and your loved ones to join our Regency Pineville family today.

Written by: Katie Hanley

Tuesday, 31 January 2017 22:14

10 Best Things for Seniors to Do in Charlotte, NC

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There are many great reasons for retirees to visit or relocate to the area, but one key to the quality of life among the modern skyscrapers and historical landmarks is the rich abundance of things for seniors to see and do in Charlotte, NC – many of the activities at a reduced price for seniors, or free. 

Regency Retirement Village at Pineville is located about 14 miles from Downtown Charlotte, which offers a wealth of things to see and do. The major attractions are:

McIntyre Historic Site – History buffs will love exploring what was the setting of a 19th-century gold rush and a Revolutionary War skirmish between British soldiers and American patriots. Enjoy a picnic at “The Battle of the Bees” and take a walk down the 1.3 mile nature trail. 

BB&T Ballpark – Take me out to the ballgame! The BB&T ball field is a minor league baseball park and home to the Charlotte Knights. Located across the street from Romare Bearden Park, enjoy a home game with the family, and maybe a bag of peanuts and cracker jacks, too.

Charlotte Senior Activities Billy Graham

The Billy Graham Library – Explore over 40,000 square feet dedicated to America’s favorite pastor, Billy Graham. You will learn about his dynamic journey of faith in the one and a half hour tour filled with stunning multimedia presentations, interactive kiosks, photos, and memorabilia. Admission is free, but if you’d like to make a contribution, donations are accepted in the lobby.

NASCAR Hall of Fame – Calling all NASCAR fans! Walk through the Ceremonial Garden to see the names of legends that decorate the NASCAR Hall of Fame, a museum honoring the history and heritage of racing. Tickets are available online or in-person at the box office. Admission is $17.95 for seniors 60 and up, and you must have a photo ID. Sign up to join the membership program - all members get in free of charge!

Charlotte Comedy City Tour – Learn and laugh on the Funny Bus! Learn more about the rich heritage of Charlotte with a 90 minute tour around the Queen City. Along with your guided tour of the city’s architecture and history, this mature comedy bus tour will throw in a good laugh or two! The price is $25 per ticket. While the bus is not wheelchair accessible, you can call to discuss your specific requirements. 

Freedom Park – This beautiful 98-acre park is the ideal spot for people-watching or entertaining grandchildren. Enjoy batting cages, baseball and soccer fields, basketball and volleyball courts, and also a concession stand. This park is family-friendly for kids of all ages to play.

Discovery Place – For those seeking an attraction to entertain grandchildren, you’ll hit pay dirt here. Science comes alive in the multiple exhibits designed for children. At Discovery Place, they’ll explore hands-on activities that encourage science in the world around them.

Carolinas Aviation Museum – Earn your wings! Browse through the 40,000 square foot hangar of Charlotte Douglas Airport, which originally consisted of only one building. The museum includes crafts of commercial, military, civil, and helicopter aviation. General admission is $12 for adults and $8 for children 6-18 years of age. Be sure to ask about senior and military discounts!

Wing Haven Garden and Bird Sanctuary – Located in the heart of Charlotte, North Carolina, this tranquil garden and bird sanctuary offers shelter for songbirds and wildlife alike. Rich in Southern horticulture, the gardens welcome visitors of all ages to discover and learn about wildlife preservation.

Tour De Food Charlotte – Take a guided tour through the city to learn all the local dives and dig in! Along the way, your tour guides will inform you about the historic facts and architecture of the Queen City. Depending on the tour, prices vary from $30-$60 per person. Wheelchair accommodations can be made upon request.

Senior discounts are available at select hotels, retail stores, restaurants, and grocery stores near these attractions. At Regency Retirement Village at Pineville, we arrange for our residents to participate in group outings to local attractions. Being part of a group of peers living together in Charlotte Assisted Living makes for a great way to experience these sights and sounds. 

To learn more about things for seniors to do in Charlotte NC, visit

Written by: Katie Hanley

Caring for an aging loved one can prove to offer many challenges, especially when siblings and other family members don’t see eye to eye. But when everyone can put aside their differences and work together, it allows seniors and their families to overcome obstacles and avoid the arguing and strife. In this month’s blog, let’s take a minute to look at some the obstacles families may face as senior parents become incapable of living without day-to-day assistance, as well as the solution for each to achieve family harmony. 

1. The Needs Are Viewed Differently

In most cases, it is extremely common for the parent-child-sibling relationship to differ when it comes to perceived needs and assistance. The senior parent or sibling may likely say they are well, either from denial or fear of moving into an assisted living arrangement, but in reality they are needing of daily care and are thus refusing to accept outside help. For instance, do they require extra help getting around the house as their mobility is declining? Or is the onset of memory related disorders, such as dementia or Alzheimer's, beginning to affect their daily activities? It is natural for the senior to perceive they are fine and to become defensive when confronted with a different appraisal of the situation.

Possible Solution: When families disagree about how much care an aging parent needs, if the senior parent needs care at all, the conflict can often be addressed by consulting expert guidance and receiving a professional recommendation. Arrange a visit, either at home or in office, to speak with the senior’s primary physician. The advice from a healthcare professional can help to definitively identify the needs and suggest an appropriate care plan for your senior loved ones. Doing so may eliminate the conflict that prevents necessary care actions. Talking with a Regency community consultant may alleviate some misconceptions that might cause aging parents to dread the inevitable. 

2. Parents Resist Senior Care

It’s normal for seniors to feel apprehensive about transitioning into assisted living. This sensitive topic can easily cause anxiety and hurt feelings, if not expressed properly. Often, a lack of effective communication results in talking down to one another instead of listening one another. 

Possible Solution: When approaching the conversation of assisted living with parents or loved ones, be concise, clear, and to the point. Let them know that you’re not trying to hurt their feelings in any way or “get rid” of them. Do your very best to express your concerns so they know that you are coming from a place of love. Also, do your best to listen to their concerns. It’s critical to provide and educate your aging parent about the many options. Today’s assisted living communities have all the comforts of home and so much more! In attempting to convince even the most incorrigible parent to consider the idea of senior care, remember to never hide any information from them. Chances are they will find out and feel that the move is a forced migration. Be open, upfront about the process of finding senior care options, and include them in every step, if possible. Lastly, take things slow if your situation gives you this luxury. Chances are a decision regarding future care plans will likely not happen overnight. Senior care specialist Debra Feldman recommends having patience and understanding in situations where resolution takes time to come to an agreement. Arranging to stay overnight in an Assisted Living community can help the senior grow more comfortable with the idea.

3. Primary Control in Decision Making

A scenario similar to the first example, occurs when one member of the family takes the responsibility as primary caregiver, leaving everyone else without say, sometimes, even the senior. This can result in one sibling’s full control of deciding how the parent is cared for, along with their estate and inheritances.

Possible Solution: Broaching the topic of assisted living and estate planning is never easy, especially if the conversation does not happen until after one member of the family has assumed full control. And while avoiding the topic may seem easier to keep the peace, family members should always approach concerns regarding the well-being of an aging parent, even though it hurts to not feel included. If a dispute arises regarding estates and inheritances, consider contacting a family mediator. They will analyze each situation fairly and objectively. While compromise may not be found through a mediator, if a will has been written, legally there is no reason for concern. At the end of the day, the focus should be that the care needs of your loved ones are being fulfilled.


Written by: Katie Hanley

The Christmas season is upon us! With ornaments hung from the tree and hot cocoa brewing, this special time of year celebrating the birth of our Lord, Jesus, can be filled with joy and cheer. However, it may not always come as a welcome season’s greetings for all. As we age, the holidays can lead to anxiety and sometimes even isolation or depression. With holiday memories of the past surfacing or extreme changes in a living situation. These can all act as triggers, leaving seniors feeling lost from their loved ones around them.

Charlotte regency senior couple christmas

This year, you can make a difference and help beat the holiday blues for the seniors in your life by simply following this guide to making the holidays happy again:


With the many events from Thanksgiving to New Years, there are several opportunities to include them into your holiday plans. Even the smallest of activities can have an immense impact on your senior's life. Whether it’s asking them to set the table, baking holiday cookies with them for Santa, or inviting them to a showing of the Nutcracker ballet. Help make them feel loved by incorporating them into your schedule this holiday season. It will give them the greatest gift of all, precious time spent with family.


Spend quality time with your senior, reminisce about the past, and make new memories together. While those recollections can sometimes trigger sadness, it can also give them something light up about. Telling tales are a great way to engage with seniors, as they have many to tell. As you spend quality time with your loved ones, ask them what their family traditions were like when they were younger. Comparing your similarities is a great way to bond during the holidays. Time spent together will also allow for new family traditions and memories to be made.


Keep things upbeat - If your senior is going through a hard time as a result of mental or health related problems, don’t let it get them down this holiday season. Stay positive! Never make them feel poorly about themselves if they can't do things the way they used to. If you’re senior parent or grandparent is used to cooking the big family meal during the holidays, but are now disabled, find ways for them to participate. For example, let them peel the potatoes or help snap the green beans for Christmas dinner. There are lots of ways to accommodate for your aging senior.


Can’t see all of your loved ones this year? Send them a Christmas card! Seniors love receiving special mail from family members and close friends. It’s not only fun for seniors but for fun for kids, too! Turn it into an annual project for the kiddos. Every year, have them draw Christmas cards to grandparents, great grandparents, and seniors without families here at Regency Assisted Living. It’s a great way to tell them you’re thinking about them this holiday season. But not all messages have to come by mail, you know. For those with long-distance relatives, it is easy to connect virtually over the internet using communication tools like Skype, FaceTime or Facebook Live using a computer, laptop or phone. No matter how far, give your senior loved ones a call to wish them a joyful, happy holidays.


The greatest gift of all, however, is time spent with family during the holidays. At Regency, we encourage our residents’ families to visit or, alternately, pick up their elder family member for a dinner, family get-together, or holiday event. For families who decide to join us during this merry and bright season, our Regency staff and team of culinary chefs work diligently to serve you and your loved ones with a memorable, special meal in our dining room.

Whatever the season holds for you, Regency Senior Living is honored to celebrate these special times with you and your family. Wishing you the happiest holiday season!

Written by: Katie Hanley

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