Regency Charlotte Blog

Charlotte senior group singingThe importance of religion and spiritual health in one's life commonly increases with age. It is especially high in seniors. Inside our Regency community, religion has emphatically influenced our residents to live a fulfilling and flourishing life. Whether this takes place in fun-filled group activities, congregational services, singing hymns together, scripture study, or just prayer in one’s own apartment, expressions of faith are vital to the lives of most Regency residents and seniors in general.

But did you know that participating in such spiritual activity offers higher physical and mental wellbeing, and also broadens life expectancy? Health benefits have been known to include offsetting the ill effects of depression, anxiety, and illness amid difficult life circumstances.

Here's the breakdown of studies:

  • In contrast to the Millennial generation, seniors are more likely to regularly participate in religious activities, as they were raised in a time when church involvement was an integral to American life. Forty-eight percent of seniors go to religious services all the time.
  • The majority of seniors studied reported that using religion to overcome life difficulties, such as an illness or the loss of a life partner. It additionally revealed that 71 percent of Southerners described themselves as "true believers" that God exists.

  • Religious gatherings are significant to the lives of our senior residents. Sixty-five percent of senior participants say that religion is exceptionally pertinent to them, their daily life, and family.

  • Religion offers a great sense of self-awareness, as well as social awareness. Sixty-seven percent of seniors said that having religious beliefs in their lives offers greater satisfaction.

The takeaway from these insights? Religious practices increase happiness, which, in turn, increases health and prosperity in seniors and the community.

At Regency, it could be said that spirituality is the cornerstone of our organization. Being a Christian institution, we value the dedication and sacrament of all religious practices, regardless of culture or belief.

In effort to empower our community and boost health and wellness, we encourage everyone to join us for motivational social events, fun, educational outings, and daily spiritual activities. Come visit us today and see what life at Regency of Charlotte has to offer! 

Written by: Katie Hanley

It's definitely not hard to acquire stuff throughout the years, yet over time there comes a peak moment when we need to rid our home of clutter and downsize into a smaller space. For most adults, that time happens when our children mature and have a family of their own, or perhaps it’s a result from a healthcare related issue.

For seniors considering decluttering, it may allow you to:

  • Start living and take advantage of retirement hassle-free.
  • Live closer to children and grandchildren.
  • Enjoy new memories without the burden of clutter.
  • Access what you want easily and within safe reach.
  • Reorganize possessions for estate planning
  • Maneuver more easily through the home in case you become disabled.
  • Downsize your home. 
  • Move into a Regency Retirement community!

The top 10 dos and don’ts in downsizing:

1. DO NOT Wait 

Spread the downsizing process out more than just a few days or even weeks. If time permits, begin at least 6-8 months in advance instead of trying to to make the difficult decisions of letting go in a shorter period of time. Also, be mindful with of your time; even though it may seem as if there is plenty of it – there never is, especially in those with a disability.

2. DO Plan

The professionals at lifehack.org advise thoughtfully planning out before jumping in head first. Take baby steps with identified zones to before beginning the long road to downsizing. For example, plan to start in the closet with old clothes, shoes, and accessories that are never worn.

senior packing

3. DO NOT Panic

Taking on a big project like this in full can easily start to feel overwhelming when looking at the big picture. Remind yourself that it has taken years to accumulate personal belongings, so the likelihood of finishing in just one day is just not realistic.

4. DO Prioritize

Belongings should be sorted into different 3 identified boxes, labeled as keep, donate, and discard. To prioritize, things that are outdated should be the first to go. For example, books that haven't been read in quite a while, furniture that is never used, et cetera. Strategists from Lifehack suggests discarding anything that does not “spark joy”.

5. DO Make Hard Choices

It’s normal to feel nostalgic about certain items that remind us of fond memories. It’s also normal to feel heartbroken and guilty when disposing of things that are special to us. While it is an extraordinarily difficult time letting these possessions go, remember that one individual's trash is another person's treasure. For making these difficult decisions, use the yes-no method. Simply ask yourself, “Do I really need 10 winter coats?” or “Will I use 3 frying pans?” This step helps the flow of sorting while remaining neutral and concise. 

6. DO NOT Create a “Maybe” Pile

This unnecessary 4th pile is a dangerous one. This gray space is where we start to question ourselves, letting doubt come between our progress. The solution? Ask yourself if you have used the item within a year. If not, chances are you won’t again. 

7. DO Adapt 

Most people prefer to age in place, however, depending on the situation this may not be an option for some seniors. The key is to adapt. Flexibility is crucial when it comes to extreme changes, especially when downsizing. For example, learn to part with belongings that take up too much space, like the never disheveled stack of loose photos. Adapt by scanning them onto the computer to keep them preserved and easily accessed. The same can be applied to music and movies with modern technology devices like Netflix, Spotify, and Apple Tv.

8. DO Repurpose and Recycle

Do consider donating, reusing, and recycling. The neighboring homeless shelters would much appreciate your closet full of unused winter coats. Need some extra pocket change? Post items online, such as eBay or Craigslist. If you have the time, host a garage sale. These methods can lessen the mess in your home and also give a second life to older items.

9. DO NOT Hoard 

A senior whose living space has become unsanitary, hazardous, or unable to function may show symptoms of an elderly hoarding disorder Be between being something of a pack rat saving things for a stormy day instead of saving and assembling things that are used, broken, chaotic or of no regard. Gatekeepers may find stores of decline or waste spread all through the house, which makes a dangerous risk for tripping and falling.

10. DO Be Sensitive

If the senior is showing hoarding behaviors, this could be a symptom of dementia or Alzheimer’s. Take note of sudden mood changes, forgetting to take prescribed medications, or letting bills go unpaid. Be sensitive towards seniors struggling to remember. They may start to feel attacked, defensive, or confused when disposing of their things. Patients suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s should be moved to our Regency Memory Care facility for their daily assisted needs.

It's imperative to start decluttering now, so the move to your new home at Regency Assisted Living can be as fluid of a transition as possible. For more information on downsizing, see tips at http://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/15-9-5-senior-downsizing tips/

 
“Keeping baggage from the past will leave no room for the happiness in the future” – Wayne L. Misner

Written by: Katie Hanley

"By one means or another we need to get more established individuals back near developing kids on the off chance that we are to reestablish a feeling of group, a learning of the past, and a feeling without bounds."

- Margaret Mead

Activities between the eras are not just an extraordinary approach to help obtain information and insight – they’re likewise fun.

Individuals of every age can take in a great deal from each other if everyone keeps a receptive outlook and values the extraordinary difficulties that go along with the task. This may appear as grandchildren showing an older generation how to utilize innovation and new technology or sharing contemporary choices in media. Similarly, youthful ones can find age-old tunes or classic motion pictures that are generally as meaningful today as they were decades prior.

The immense difficulty we face is building up the basic knowledge of others, which may include a conflict of qualities when individuals from various age groups work and learn together.

Does the WWII vet who hasn't addressed the effects of war have anything at all in common with a youngster inclined to over sharing details about her day on Twitter? Will a senior, whose state of mind about race and gender roles were shaped amid more difficult times, talk eagerly with the student who grew up finding out about the Civil Rights Era from history books?

At the point when individuals coincide, it begins to dissipate negative and harsh generalizations we too often make of others.  charlotte youth and senior

Researcher Dr. Morris Massey said, “We don’t have to agree with the values of different generations, but we can strive to understand the mind-sets of different generations and how each group sees the world based on their experiences.”

Though a senior may only interact in person or by means of telephone, a younger generation may only connect through advanced technological means such as email or instant message. Spanning such differences requires adaptability in your reasoning and thinking.

We are molded by the occasions of our lives, and history occurs in repeated cycles. People born after WW2, for instance, most likely had their virtues affected by parents who grew up amid the economic downturn of the Great Depression. They may discover a shared view with Generation X-ers who recall the economic crisis of 2008, or new school graduates who have attempted to discover steady employment ever since.

The advantage of intergenerational association for seniors is lessening disengagement and destitution among our elderly community, who in turn enhance the lives of children, young adults, and seniors by sharing their understanding on the world as leaders, examples, or teachers. Through regular communication, they can become supporters for each other and solve problems relating to lack of education, ecological and health issues, crime avoidance, and a so many more.

As indicated by Generations United, such intergenerational exercises permit seniors to stay dynamic and connected to their community, which adds to living longer with better physical and emotional health. Overall, they tend to appreciate a higher personal satisfaction from having meaningful relationships in young adults and children.

“Older adults who regularly volunteer with children burn 20% more calories per week, experience fewer falls, are less reliant on canes, and perform better on a memory test than their peers,” the organization states. “Older adults with dementia experience more positive effect during interactions with children.”

What’s the advantage for our younger generations? Creating abilities and valuable life skills, values, and a feeling of citizenship. By imparting a culture, historical and cultural customs are well preserved.

"Together we are stronger," states Generations United.

At Regency at Pineville, everyday life is an intergenerational movement as our youthful staff and volunteers look after seniors and those requiring additional help with daily tasks. We welcome that our senior community offers a breadth of intelligence and advice to us and are a quality to society by their endeavors to contribute to their Regency community in every effort possible.

For more information on communication with intergenerational groups, the Charmm'd Foundation offers a list that can be seen at: http://www.charmmdfoundation.org/resource-library/effective-communication/checklist-communicating-different-generations

Call today and talk with our Activities Director to learn of satisfying ways you can start working with seniors.

To discover more about Regency Senior Living Charlotte, call (704) 542-9449. 

Written by: Katie Hanley

Long ago, spring cleaning was necessary after a winter of coal fires, oil lamps, and soot accumulating in the house. These days winter doesn’t make as much of a mess and there isn’t as much spring cleaning to do, especially if you live in a retirement community where most of the daily chores are taken care of for the residents. However, there’s something about spring cleaning that always feels nice, even if it doesn’t involve a true deep cleaning with lots of scrubbing and elbow grease. It’s simply a pleasant tradition to take spring as the opportunity to refresh your home and simplify your life. Here are our top five tips for making the most of your spring cleaning:

  1. Books are fun to read, but they can pile up after a while. Sort through your shelves and see what you might like to re-read and what you might like to pass along. You could organize a book swap with friends or family to get some new reading material, or take your leftovers to a used bookstore, which usually offer cash or trade credit you can use towards something new on your reading list. 
  2. Update your medicine cabinet. Most prescriptions, and even over-the-counter medicines and toiletry items, have expiration dates. Now is a great time to check the dates on the items in your bathroom, bedside table, or handbag. Make a note of everything you use regularly, even if you don’t have a prescription. That information could come in handy the next time you go to the doctor, so you can double check on drug interactions or have a better sense of what minor ailments crop up regularly that might need a more serious approach. If you have any expired medications or prescriptions that you no longer take, don’t flush them or throw them out. The CMC Rx Medical Center Central Plaza has a drug-take-back program that will safely dispose of medications. Call them at 704-355-6900 to find out how you can participate.
  3. You might be pulling out your summer clothes and putting away the sweaters and heavier items now that the weather is getting warmer. As you trade out seasons, consider you closet. If there is anything you haven’t worn in over a year that doesn’t have sentimental value, you might want to sell it on consignment or donate it to a charity shop like Goodwill or Salvation Army. Life is always easier when you’ve simplified and have less cluttering up your closets. You can also see what items might need to be taken to a tailor, cobbler, or for special cleaning, as well as if there are any pieces of clothing you wish you had but haven’t yet purchased. With so many sales at this time of year to clear out stock for summer merchandise, you might be able to get some great deals on the essentials.
  4. We’ve survived yet another tax season, which means you can do a last bit of financial spring cleaning for the year. Make sure your financial paperwork is filed away in a safe place, that you don’t need to adjust any of your retirement or investment accounts, and that your budget has you where you need to be for monthly expenses.
  5. Spring clean your body with some self-care. Go for a long walk to enjoy the nice weather, or read a book outdoors or at a local park to soak up a little extra fresh air and sunshine. Maybe you want to book a massage or a body scrub at a nearby spa to refresh your skin and muscles after a long, dry winter. Paint your nails a bright color for the season or try a new scent of aftershave. Even little treats can signal what a special time of year it is, and that you deserve the best!

 

Monday, 30 June 2014 17:16

Laughter Heals Charlotte Seniors

Want to know a fun, free and easy way to instantly feel better?

Laugh!

Not only does having a sense of humor feel good and make life more fun – it can also do wonders for the mind, spirit and body of Charlotte seniors.

Laughing at a movie or TV show provides a physical emotional release that restores a sense of balance that leaves us feeling cleansed afterward.

Our bodies naturally have antibodies to attack disease, and humor increases the number of them working for us, as well as their effectiveness, resulting in a stronger immune system.  The human body also produces several stress hormones like adrenaline, cortisol and epinephrine, which laughing meets head on with the triggered release of endorphins. These chemicals not only make us feel good. They also temporarily relieve aches and pains.

Laughter is a distraction that pulls us away from stress, anger, resentment, disappointments, and so forth. It can also keep us grounded in ways that gives us an entirely new perspective on our world. Things that caused worry and angst yesterday can melt into a relaxed state if our mind is pulled into a more positive place.

Most of the things we worry about never even materialize, so humor can make us more playful and creative rather than anxious, angry or sad. When we are relaxed, the tension in our muscles gives way and blood vessels flow more effectively, reducing the dangers of heart attacks.

The unfortunate thing is most people do not laugh nearly enough, but we can often manufacture a state of laughter by smiling, which tends to attract others, which creates opportunities to laugh while participating in fun activities like miniature golfing or bowling.

Trying watching a funny movie on TV and see if your chuckles do not cause you to feel noticeably better.

Photo Credit: porschelinn via Compfight cc

Request Information