Regency Charlotte Blog

If you’ve spent time with someone suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia, you know from experience that communication can be a challenge. Long term memories go hazy, words aren’t always on the tip of the tongue, and you might be getting used to a shift in roles, such as child to caretaker. But with creative expression, you can ease some of the communication frustrations that come with the types of dementia. Creative expression is as simple as drawing images while listening to music, storytelling, dancing, and many more!  Artistic expressions can have a major impact, not only on quality time spent with loved ones, but on their overall mood and communication skills.

Charlotte dementia care activities

Studies have shown that giving seniors the opportunity to express themselves in this way can have a major benefit for their cognitive function, mental health, and quality of life. After all, just because they don’t discuss the same subjects and memories they used to doesn’t mean they don’t have something to say. Creative expression is a great opportunity to tap into feelings, observations, humor, and knowledge. The healing powers of art and other forms of creative expression, can likewise enhance memory and the ability to reminisce.

Those who have facilitated storytelling workshops and other narrative activities for seniors have noted that even those who are usually quiet and reluctant to speak become more engaged after participating in creative projects. In groups, memory care patients find new ways to relate and relay information. All that matters is that the seniors are invited to share in a positive environment. These exercises have been clinically shown to not only benefits patients, but caregivers, too. By focusing on what empowers and delights seniors, in return friends, family, and professionals have a more rounded view of those with dementia and Alzheimer’s and their capabilities.

One 2009 study revealed that the creative storytelling method can foster meaningful engagement between patients with dementia and their caregivers by encouraging seniors to rediscover their imaginations. In other words, by focusing on what memory care residents are good at and what they enjoy, the focus is put on the individual, rather than their condition.

The activity itself is pretty simple. Take photos of humans, animals, or even illustrations and ask residents what they think. Show another image, and ask how that impacts the narrative. For example, you could show a man on a plane, followed by an image of the same man on the beach. What do participants think he is doing? Is he on vacation? A scientist? A father in search of his long lost children? The possibilities are endless, as is the fun you might have when discussing them with the assisted living resident in your life.

Written by: Meghan O’Dea

Tuesday, 28 February 2017 22:40

Your Guide to Senior Care Services

Regency at Pineville offers full continuum care, along with numerous services and amenities for community residents. If you are considering senior care but don’t know which care option is the best fit, here are the various senior care options available to you. Charlotte Senior Care Guide

Independent living: this retirement lifestyle is ideal for those who are still active and independent, but prefer to have someone cook and clean for them.

Independent living may be for you if:

  • You are capable of living autonomously
  • You are not in need of medical care

In-home caregiving: this senior care lifestyle is contingent upon the condition of the senior, which involves routine checkups to guarantee the wellbeing and personal satisfaction of the senior.

In-Home Care may be for you if:

  • You need assistance with routine household care and daily tasks
  • You are worried about the higher costs of assisted living

Assisted Living: this senior care lifestyle is ideal for mature seniors who find that they require help from others to get around or fulfill daily tasks, not including intensive medical care treatments.

Assisted Living may be for you if:

  • You need help with day to day tasks, e.g. showering, dressing, and pharmaceuticals
  • You are required to have 24-hour monitoring and an emergency response system

Memory Care: this specialized senior care offers a vibrant quality of life to residents in need of personalized care considerations and exercises.

Memory Care may be for you if:

  • You are encountering the onset of dementia or Alzheimer's
  • You are in need of a full continuum care community

As with any medical decision, consult with a doctor or healthcare specialist for their professional recommendation of which senior care level is right for you. Additionally, for questions or concerns regarding senior care placement, contact us today for your no commitment consultation! Our community consultant specialists are available to assess resident needs, answer senior living inquiries, and happily welcome you and your loved ones to join our Regency Pineville family today.

Written by: Katie Hanley

It's definitely not hard to acquire stuff throughout the years, yet over time there comes a peak moment when we need to rid our home of clutter and downsize into a smaller space. For most adults, that time happens when our children mature and have a family of their own, or perhaps it’s a result from a healthcare related issue.

For seniors considering decluttering, it may allow you to:

  • Start living and take advantage of retirement hassle-free.
  • Live closer to children and grandchildren.
  • Enjoy new memories without the burden of clutter.
  • Access what you want easily and within safe reach.
  • Reorganize possessions for estate planning
  • Maneuver more easily through the home in case you become disabled.
  • Downsize your home. 
  • Move into a Regency Retirement community!

The top 10 dos and don’ts in downsizing:

1. DO NOT Wait 

Spread the downsizing process out more than just a few days or even weeks. If time permits, begin at least 6-8 months in advance instead of trying to to make the difficult decisions of letting go in a shorter period of time. Also, be mindful with of your time; even though it may seem as if there is plenty of it – there never is, especially in those with a disability.

2. DO Plan

The professionals at lifehack.org advise thoughtfully planning out before jumping in head first. Take baby steps with identified zones to before beginning the long road to downsizing. For example, plan to start in the closet with old clothes, shoes, and accessories that are never worn.

senior packing

3. DO NOT Panic

Taking on a big project like this in full can easily start to feel overwhelming when looking at the big picture. Remind yourself that it has taken years to accumulate personal belongings, so the likelihood of finishing in just one day is just not realistic.

4. DO Prioritize

Belongings should be sorted into different 3 identified boxes, labeled as keep, donate, and discard. To prioritize, things that are outdated should be the first to go. For example, books that haven't been read in quite a while, furniture that is never used, et cetera. Strategists from Lifehack suggests discarding anything that does not “spark joy”.

5. DO Make Hard Choices

It’s normal to feel nostalgic about certain items that remind us of fond memories. It’s also normal to feel heartbroken and guilty when disposing of things that are special to us. While it is an extraordinarily difficult time letting these possessions go, remember that one individual's trash is another person's treasure. For making these difficult decisions, use the yes-no method. Simply ask yourself, “Do I really need 10 winter coats?” or “Will I use 3 frying pans?” This step helps the flow of sorting while remaining neutral and concise. 

6. DO NOT Create a “Maybe” Pile

This unnecessary 4th pile is a dangerous one. This gray space is where we start to question ourselves, letting doubt come between our progress. The solution? Ask yourself if you have used the item within a year. If not, chances are you won’t again. 

7. DO Adapt 

Most people prefer to age in place, however, depending on the situation this may not be an option for some seniors. The key is to adapt. Flexibility is crucial when it comes to extreme changes, especially when downsizing. For example, learn to part with belongings that take up too much space, like the never disheveled stack of loose photos. Adapt by scanning them onto the computer to keep them preserved and easily accessed. The same can be applied to music and movies with modern technology devices like Netflix, Spotify, and Apple Tv.

8. DO Repurpose and Recycle

Do consider donating, reusing, and recycling. The neighboring homeless shelters would much appreciate your closet full of unused winter coats. Need some extra pocket change? Post items online, such as eBay or Craigslist. If you have the time, host a garage sale. These methods can lessen the mess in your home and also give a second life to older items.

9. DO NOT Hoard 

A senior whose living space has become unsanitary, hazardous, or unable to function may show symptoms of an elderly hoarding disorder Be between being something of a pack rat saving things for a stormy day instead of saving and assembling things that are used, broken, chaotic or of no regard. Gatekeepers may find stores of decline or waste spread all through the house, which makes a dangerous risk for tripping and falling.

10. DO Be Sensitive

If the senior is showing hoarding behaviors, this could be a symptom of dementia or Alzheimer’s. Take note of sudden mood changes, forgetting to take prescribed medications, or letting bills go unpaid. Be sensitive towards seniors struggling to remember. They may start to feel attacked, defensive, or confused when disposing of their things. Patients suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s should be moved to our Regency Memory Care facility for their daily assisted needs.

It's imperative to start decluttering now, so the move to your new home at Regency Assisted Living can be as fluid of a transition as possible. For more information on downsizing, see tips at http://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/15-9-5-senior-downsizing tips/

 
“Keeping baggage from the past will leave no room for the happiness in the future” – Wayne L. Misner

Written by: Katie Hanley

"By one means or another we need to get more established individuals back near developing kids on the off chance that we are to reestablish a feeling of group, a learning of the past, and a feeling without bounds."

- Margaret Mead

Activities between the eras are not just an extraordinary approach to help obtain information and insight – they’re likewise fun.

Individuals of every age can take in a great deal from each other if everyone keeps a receptive outlook and values the extraordinary difficulties that go along with the task. This may appear as grandchildren showing an older generation how to utilize innovation and new technology or sharing contemporary choices in media. Similarly, youthful ones can find age-old tunes or classic motion pictures that are generally as meaningful today as they were decades prior.

The immense difficulty we face is building up the basic knowledge of others, which may include a conflict of qualities when individuals from various age groups work and learn together.

Does the WWII vet who hasn't addressed the effects of war have anything at all in common with a youngster inclined to over sharing details about her day on Twitter? Will a senior, whose state of mind about race and gender roles were shaped amid more difficult times, talk eagerly with the student who grew up finding out about the Civil Rights Era from history books?

At the point when individuals coincide, it begins to dissipate negative and harsh generalizations we too often make of others.  charlotte youth and senior

Researcher Dr. Morris Massey said, “We don’t have to agree with the values of different generations, but we can strive to understand the mind-sets of different generations and how each group sees the world based on their experiences.”

Though a senior may only interact in person or by means of telephone, a younger generation may only connect through advanced technological means such as email or instant message. Spanning such differences requires adaptability in your reasoning and thinking.

We are molded by the occasions of our lives, and history occurs in repeated cycles. People born after WW2, for instance, most likely had their virtues affected by parents who grew up amid the economic downturn of the Great Depression. They may discover a shared view with Generation X-ers who recall the economic crisis of 2008, or new school graduates who have attempted to discover steady employment ever since.

The advantage of intergenerational association for seniors is lessening disengagement and destitution among our elderly community, who in turn enhance the lives of children, young adults, and seniors by sharing their understanding on the world as leaders, examples, or teachers. Through regular communication, they can become supporters for each other and solve problems relating to lack of education, ecological and health issues, crime avoidance, and a so many more.

As indicated by Generations United, such intergenerational exercises permit seniors to stay dynamic and connected to their community, which adds to living longer with better physical and emotional health. Overall, they tend to appreciate a higher personal satisfaction from having meaningful relationships in young adults and children.

“Older adults who regularly volunteer with children burn 20% more calories per week, experience fewer falls, are less reliant on canes, and perform better on a memory test than their peers,” the organization states. “Older adults with dementia experience more positive effect during interactions with children.”

What’s the advantage for our younger generations? Creating abilities and valuable life skills, values, and a feeling of citizenship. By imparting a culture, historical and cultural customs are well preserved.

"Together we are stronger," states Generations United.

At Regency at Pineville, everyday life is an intergenerational movement as our youthful staff and volunteers look after seniors and those requiring additional help with daily tasks. We welcome that our senior community offers a breadth of intelligence and advice to us and are a quality to society by their endeavors to contribute to their Regency community in every effort possible.

For more information on communication with intergenerational groups, the Charmm'd Foundation offers a list that can be seen at: http://www.charmmdfoundation.org/resource-library/effective-communication/checklist-communicating-different-generations

Call today and talk with our Activities Director to learn of satisfying ways you can start working with seniors.

To discover more about Regency Senior Living Charlotte, call (704) 542-9449. 

Written by: Katie Hanley

Wednesday, 30 March 2016 16:35

10 Spring Activities for Senior in Charlotte

The blooming trees, flowers, and warmer weather signal the return of springtime for Charlotte seniors to get outside and enjoy. While there are many ways for any senior to enjoy the beauty that comes along with the season’s change, caution and preparedness are imperative to ensure safety against the sun, when spending time outdoors.

“Oh my goodness it’s already April!” said Jamie Jollie, Executive Director at Regency at Pineville, in the most recent newsletter. “We are so excited to have the flowers blooming and residents sitting outside, goodbye to the cold!”

While mobility issues may keep some seniors from fully enjoying Mother Nature’s great outdoors, most agree that even sitting outside and breathing in the fresh air is a welcome change, after the long winter months. Before being too physically active, it is important for individuals to speak with a doctor in order to be aware of any limitations. Regardless of how time is spent soaking up the sunshine, Vitamin D will also be soaked up, which is very important for everyone. It is not only important for bone strength, but research is now showing that there is a link between Vitamin D and improved cognitive function.

Here are 10 ideas for seniors in Charlotte to do in springtime:

  1. Go for a Walk. After spending time mostly indoors during winter months, spring is a great time to make a habit of taking a daily walk, to strengthen muscles and improve mobility. Morning is the best time to take advantage of the sun, without the heat being too overbearing.
  2. Work in the garden. Whether you enjoy planting flowers, plants, or vegetables, working in a garden can offer physical and mental benefits. Time spent digging in the dirt is a relaxing, stress reducing task, which is also very rewarding once the hard work pays off and the garden starts growing.
  3. Watch the Birds. Anyone can enjoy this fun activity, regardless of the level of knowledge about birds. Just get some binoculars and enjoy the interaction between these feathered friends. Getting a book to identify birds that are indigenous to the southeast can add another level of fun!
  4. Visit a Park with Grandchildren. Spending time with children has the ability to bring out the kid in all of us. Whether it is a trip to fly a kite, have a picnic, or just stare at the clouds, spending time outdoors with the grandkids offers benefits to everyone; they get a much needed break from video games, and quality time is enjoyed by all.
  5. Peruse a Farmer’s Market. The Pineville Farmers Market on Dover Street is open every Saturday from 8 am to noon and offers fruits, vegetables, herbs and artisan foods direct from area farmers.
  6. Catch a Baseball Game. The Charlotte Knights start their season on April 14th and have a lot of home games scheduled at BB&T BallPark. What could be better than peanuts, cracker jacks, and baseball on a beautiful spring day?
  7. Plan a Day Trip. There is no need to travel far in order to take a day trip. Especially on hotter days, seniors can cool off by visiting one of the many museums nearby, including Bechtler Museum of Modern Art. Most even offer senior discounts, so don’t forget to ask.
  8. Enjoy a Concert. Charlotte offers many opportunities to enjoy live music indoors and outdoors. For a more relaxing, harmonious experience, there is also the Charlotte Symphony which offers everything from Beethoven to ABBA.
  9. Go Fishing. Why not take in the beauty of nature and enjoy a recreational activity, like fishing? Even those confined to a wheelchair can cast a line from a dock and reel in a catch. There are many locations to choose from, including the nearby Davie Lake, located in William R. Davis Park.
  10. Do Some Spring Cleaning. They call it “spring cleaning” for a great reason…this is the perfect time to sort through clutter, discard or donate old things, and freshen up living spaces!

Additionally, there are plenty of local events, fairs, and festivals in Charlotte to take part in and choose from, depending on personal interests.

One thing for seniors to remember when getting out into the warmer weather and sunshine is to prepare and be cautious in order to avoid heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and other side effects that can accompany prolonged heat exposure.

A few tips to remember are:

  • Wear light, loose clothingFreedom Park Charlotte
  • Stay hydrated
  • Apply sunscreen and wear a wide-brimmed hat
  • Stay in shaded areas when possible
  • Avoid being out during peak hours
  • Pay close attention to the heat index

These are just a few tips to enhance enjoyment of spring and the warmer weather, in a safe way.

To learn more about Regency at Pineville, call us at (844) 425-4254.

Written by Kristen Camden

boating

It would be difficult to find a person who has not dreamed of the day that they finally are able to retire from work and live care-free days, leisurely traveling and enjoying life. However, many do not factor a budget into that daydream in order to fund that exciting, fun-filled life.

There are ways to prepare and gauge how long retirement savings will last. Seniors should also maintain a monthly budget and stick to it, in order to stretch the nest egg.

Thankfully, money is not needed for all activities available in Charlotte, or in general. There are many ways to enrich daily life during retirement, and to find enjoyment, such as learning a new hobby or visiting local attractions.

Charlotte is home to the Carolinas Aviation Museum, Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden, Charlotte Nature Museum, Wing Haven Gardens, as well as multiple themed tours led by Charlotte NC Tours. The city also boasts an extensive list of attractions for lovers of the arts: Bechtler Museum of Modern Art, Mint Museum Uptown, Blumenthal Performing Arts, Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Charlotte Ballet, and many more.

Beyond local attractions, seniors have the opportunity to further enrich their lives on their own. A few examples might include:

  • Developing a new hobby
  • Volunteering for a cause
  • Getting a part-time job
  • Reading books, old or new
  • Writing poetry, stories, etc.
  • Mentoring
  • Being active, whether you walk or just play cards
  • Expressing creativity through art or music
  • Traveling
  • Serving the community

Regency Retirement Community of Charlotte also offers various exciting activities and ways to stay involved each month. This month, the Girl Scouts will visit to help make crafts, pianist Ethan Uslan will perform, there will be an Easter egg hunt, as well as many more activities.

Regency is dedicated to its residents’ wellbeing and happiness, making the city of Charlotte the perfect complement, with its extensive list of activities and fun.  To learn more, call (844) 425-4254, or visit our community at 9120 Willow Ridge Road, Charlotte, NC.


Written by Kristen Camden

Published in Active Senior Living

Seniors are a precious historical resourceCharlotte seniors can benefit from telling their life stories to family, caregivers or personal historians to write it down or record on audio or video.

“The known advantage of doing (life reviews) include improving the attitudes of younger adults toward older adults and vice versa, finding meaning in life, improving problem-solving skills, assisting with the grief process, increasing emotional support, strengthening self-esteem, decreasing depression and anxiety, and developing interventions for individuals with dementia,” said John Kunz, a member of the International Institute for Reminiscence and Life Review.

That organization provides guidance to family members or caregivers who find themselves in the role of collecting biographies or choosing “personal historians” who interview seniors to collect their tales. While it may be more practical to give an oral history to a family member, paid personal historians may be less likely to have an emotional reaction and thus be more supportive to stories that address difficult or embarrassing family situations. A grown child, for example, may omit an admission that his or her mother was not the love of his father’s life.

When providing a life review, remember:

Details bring stories to life. Facts alone rarely tell the entire story. Stories may be for immediate grandchildren or descendants up to hundreds of years from now as a genealogical resource. It’s important to choose a medium (written down/smartphone video) that will be preserved even as technology continues to evolve. How many personal moments caught on VHS videotape are being lost by people who haven’t hired a company to transfer the footage to digital format? A printed book complete with photos may be an easier heirloom to pass down to the next generation, and many can be produced affordably these days in small quantities.

A life review should be done with some idea of who will read a person’s stories and whether it covers the person’s entire life or just a part of it.

It sometimes helps to review painful periods, and a senior’s survival techniques can be a valuable aid to future readers when they go through similar dark times. A person may need to feel secure in order to talk about painful events. People tend to look back at the “good ole days” with sentimentality. Taking an honest inventory of life events and creating a list of regrets can lead to a cathartic release in which a person finally vents about something he or she may have carried around with them for years.

No matter how “ordinary” the senior might think his or her life is, it’s extraordinary to descendants, to historians, and to future readers, putting an individual point of view on collective moments such as watching the moon landing or a memorable sporting event.

The tragedy is that most people never get around to writing their memoirs because they always assume there will be plenty of time, but tomorrow is never a guarantee for anyone, regardless of age.

Don’t wait until memories begin to fade to start sharing.

 

Written by Steven Stiefel

Charlotte NC retirement livingMoving from a longtime house to a retirement community like Regency is about creating a supportive environment rather than the senior losing anything. There’s a lot to be gained – safety, less stress, entertainment, friendship, and fun – without sacrificing the things that contribute to quality of life.

Assisted Living facilities like Regency Retirement Village are about offering help in a homelike environment where residents can live as independently as possible. Individual apartments preserve the senior’s privacy and dignity while help with activities of daily living such as supervision of medications, dressing and bathing. This helping hand can be the difference between struggling and thriving.

Some seniors dread transitioning from their house to a community because they imagine being sent against their will to someplace unpleasant, but a tour of our facility quickly shatters those misconceptions.

Fear of change should be trumped by anxiety of what can happen when help is not readily available. We’ve all seen the commercials where a senior has fallen and can’t get up, and sadly, the headlines far too often reflect cases where the elderly fall prey to home invasions and con-artists. These apprehensions evaporate when the resident shares a secure space with others dedicated to his or her well-being.

Charlotte retirement communities are not just a place to put the old – most of us, regardless of age, would love to the luxury of having another person mow the grass, shovel the snow, make the food, put away the dishes, clean up and generally take care of us. These are all perks of our golden years after decades of working hard and looking after everyone else’s needs.

Moving to Assisted Living also improves family relationships by reducing the burden on family caregivers who can finally enjoy quality interactions without feelings of guilt or resentment. Time spent together becomes about laughing and playing, plus grown children can sleep easier knowing mom or dad are in a place surrounded by new friends and activities to keep them stimulated for a better quality of life than living alone.

Yes, it is pretty special having your own home, but it is not the only way to enjoy your own space. Sometimes that is possible while surrounded by caring staff to help make life a bit easier.

Call (704) 542-9449 to arrange a free consultation and tour of Regency Retirement Village. 

Written by Steven Stiefel

Published in Retirement Communities

Charlotte NC seniors stay cool while gardeningIt’s already been a scorching hot summer and the season has only just begun.

In the most recent newsletter, Executive Director Jamie Jollie said, "Yesterday I went to start my car and the END of the day and my thermometer said 101 degrees! It's a good thing we have so many wonderful things going on inside to help beat the heat."

With summer heat in mind, here are some tips for making sure you and the ones you love stay cool. Infants and anyone with a chronic illness need special attention, as do outdoor pets.

Dehydration from being in the heat and not getting adequate liquids can lead to hospitalization. Older adults are particularly at risk due to changes in renal function and body water composition.

Signs include confusion, problems with walking or falling, dizziness or headaches, dry or sticky mouth and tongue, sunken eyes, inability to sweat or produce tears, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure or blood pressure that drops when changing from lying to standing, constipation and decreased urine.

A caregiver like the ones at Regency work to keep our seniors healthy and hydrated, but what about friends and family who may live alone and struggle to keep cool in the oppressive heat?

Some tips to remember:

  •          If going outdoors is necessary, it is best done in the early morning or late evening when temperatures will be cooler.
  •           Fill a plastic bottle with water and put it in the freezer; grab it when ready to go outside and enjoy cold water longer as it melts.
  •           Use fans to help circulate air because even a home with air-conditioning can feel warm if the air is not getting to you.
  •           Wearing loose-fitting, light colored clothes will keep us cooler. Cotton clothing is cooler than synthetics.
  •           Avoid caffeine and alcohol, which promote dehydration. Sugary drinks can also have a negative effect.
  •         If someone lacks air-conditioning, they can spend time during the day in climate-controlled public places such as a shopping mall, public library, movie theater, or other space. Some cities also dedicate space for cooling centers open to the public.
  •           Avoid activities in direct sunlight.
  •         Try eating fruits and vegetables with a high water content (cucumber, celery, watermelon, tomatoes, lettuce/spinach). Avoid cooking foods that require using a stove.
  •        Plan indoor activities such as organizing scrapbooks, reading books, listening to music, getting organized, etc.

With a little caution and following these steps, you can stay cooler this summer and help your loved ones remain safe in the shade. 

Written by Steven Stiefel

Published in Active Senior Living

Long gone are the days when time off from school mean helping in the fields or with the family business. Neighborhoods have also changed a lot, and chidden don’t have the same freedom to roam and make their own fun as previous generations did. Fortunately, there’s a great opportunity there to bond with the special young people in your life over summer break, and to have special outings with your grandchildren or other young relatives. Make special memories together, tell them your stories, and find out who they are becoming. There’s nothing like quality time spent together. Here are four ideas for summer vacation outings you can enjoy with the youngsters in your life:

The Carolinas Aviation Museum

Charlotte Carolinas Aviation Museum

It’s easy to take airplanes for granted as an adult, but children still get excited about the incredible possibilities of flight. Rekindle the amazement of aviation at a museum dedicated to it, and Charlotte’s unique role in the era of human flight. See real antique aircraft, commercial airplanes, and military fighter jets. You might even get to board a historic DC-7 plane that once flew non-stop routes from New York to London. The museum provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personal with these amazing machines. You might find the exhibits to be a great conversation starter about the first time you flew, your service in the military, or other exciting memories to share with the little ones. Tell them all about it with a post-museum picnic at Airport Overlook Park, where you can watch the planes land and take off at the Charlotte/Douglas International Airport.

Discovery Place and Discovery Place Kids

Kids of all ages can enjoy these unique attractions, which feature hands-on science lab stations, a deep sea aquarium, a 3D digital theater that lets kids get a taste of what it’s like on a movie set, an IMAX theater, and more. Discovery Place Kids is for the younger set, with interactive exhibits like a submarine experience as well as regular programing like puppet shows. With so much to see and do, you could definitely get repeat visits here throughout the summer, and no doubt the little ones will have a lot to say about everything they learned.

Wing Haven Gardens and Bird Sanctuary

If your little ones like to get up close and personal with nature they’ll love this 4-acre sanctuary where they can discover birds, rabbits, turtles, frogs, chipmunks, and other woodland creatures in their natural habitat. Founded by Elizabeth Clarkson, she specifically wanted to create a place where a garden was not only a place to look at beautiful blooms, but was a space where animals could thrive. You’ll definitely make many memories here as you see Peter Rabbit and his friends making new narratives throughout the beautiful space.

Carolina Raptor Center

If nature is a big hit, check out the Raptor Center where you can view 23 different species of of birds of prey. The 3/4 mile trail isn’t difficult to walk, and is situated on an old plantation. Enjoy the beautiful scenery around Mountain Island Lake, let the kids stretch their legs and burn off some energy, and take in these beautiful and inspiring birds.

Written by Meghan O'Dea

Published in Active Senior Living
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